Saturday, March 28, 2015

Our Perfumed Garden Of Garbage at Bandra Bazar Road

I shot this at 7.30 am today while going for my morning walk.. I had stopped walking for last three days due to my hectic schedule and even this morning due to the horrendous heat I had thought of skipping my walk..but the idea of walking in the evening at the MET gardens is chaotic with unruly kids the evening the MET Cricket grounds becomes a Miya Park..of utter confusion and the security guards are too scared of being beaten by the Muslim kids so they shut their lips .. and the senior citizens bear the brunt.

I walked about 5 km came home slept and went out in the evening and shot the Ram Navmi Saibaba Palki at Jain Mandir Road Bandra on my mobile phone.

For me  in the mornings there is no escape from garbage ,,god had decided that it is garbage I must shoot and end up as garbage once I leave this filthy earthly surroundings of my backyard..and for the dirt filth and neglect of Bandra Bazar Road the residents , the Bandra Municipality and the BJP local representatives and the lone Congress corporator are equally to blame ,, and whether one local representative lives at Bazar Road and the other at Worli matters not our area got defeated badly by its vote for the Modi Wave ..

And so I shall keep on shooting the insanity of my garbage moments , those at Pali Hill Carter Road Band Stand Turner Road Joggers Park dont have to face the agony of living or buying fish mutton no beef at Bandra Bazar Market , even God wears a hijab when he comes to shop in our area covered from head to toe with two slanting slits for eyes.

Modijis Swach Bharat is a total eyewash,, on the soul of Bandra Bazar Road.. instead of removing the dirt in our system , rogue police officials worse than terrorists , bureaucrat extortionists ,rapists child molesters , crooks in the Parliament and hoodlums murderers and cheaters we are busy trying to cleanse India by removing garbage generated by man with a lousy system of garbage management .

Because The Muslims Dont Give Him Alms At A Hindu Temple He Begs

he is a blind man
with the aid of a
stick he walks
he begs he pleads
but in silence to
me he talked
the hindu
gave him
alms he
blessed them
around the
temple block
when you are
hungry hopeless
religion does not
matter is charity
the essence of
humanity .. bulwark
beggars gods lost
tribe forgotten flock

Babulnath Temple

Babulnath is an ancient Shiva temple in Mumbai, India. Situated on a small hillock near Girgaum Chowpatty, it is one of oldest temples in the city,[1] Shiva in the form of the Lord of the Babul tree is the main deity in this temple. The faithful climb up to the temple and obtain Darshan of the shivling and obtain blessings of the Lord. It is also possible to take an elevator up to the temple. The temples is visited by lakhs of devotees on annual Mahashivratri festival.[1]

Since Raja Bhimdev's Time[edit]

Front view of the Temple'
Babulnath Temple Shiva Linga and Idols were originally consecrated in the 12th century by the then Hindu king Raja Bhimdev of the region. Over a period of time the temple was buried and lost over a period of time. The idols were re-discovered (unearthed) during the period of 1700 to 1780. The first temple was built in the 1780 year.

'Babulnath, Maharashtriyan style'
When rediscovered, 5 original idols were dug out. That of the main Shiva Linga, Ganesh, Hanuman, Parvati and one more. Out of this the first four are in the temple. The fifth one was immersed in the sea because it was broken when it was dug out in the 18th century.

When the first temple was built the land belonged to the Parsi community. There were 5 Dakhma's (Parsi final resting place) existing in the vicinity. There was a lot of resistance for the Parsi community at that time for building of the temple. This resistance continued till the late 1800 when the issue was settled by the courts in favour of the temple.

Old Temple[edit]
The Babulnath Temple was patronised when built for the first time by Hindu merchant of that time and mainly the Gujarati community. A bigger temple was built in 1890 by contributions from the Gujarati merchants and the likes of Maharaja Sayajirao Gaikwad of Baroda state. The current temple structure can be dated back to 1890. The temple height was considerable when built in 1890 but a lightning strike in the 1960s and damage to the spire lowered the height of the present temple considerably. Till the 1980s Babulnath Temple was one of the Tallest structure & location in the city of Mumbai.

There is limited reference to Babulnath Temple in the historical texts, because in the initial days the temple was frequented by yogis who used to stay there for Bhang and Ganja. However the temple famed in the 20th century. Currently the temple is thronged by people on Mondays and during Mahashivratri & Shravan months.

Banganga Tank Walkeshwar

Banganga or Banganga Tank is an ancient[1] water tank which is part of the Walkeshwar Temple Complex in Malabar Hill area of Mumbai in India.
See also: History of Mumbai
The Tank was built in the 1127 AD, by Lakshman Prabhu, a minister in the court of Silhara dynasty kings of Thane.[2][3]

It was rebuilt in 1715 AD, out of a donation for the Walkeshwar Temple by Rama Kamath.[4] The main temple, has been reconstructed since then and is at present a reinforced concrete structure of recent construction.

Banganga in Mythology[edit]

Banganga Temple sikhara
According to local legend, it sprang forth when the Lord Ram, the exiled hero of the epic Ramayana, stopped at the spot in search of his kidnapped wife Sita.

As the legend goes, overcome with fatigue and thirst, Rama asked his brother Lakshmana to bring him some water. Laxman instantly shot an arrow into the ground, and water gushed forth from the ground, creating a tributary of the Ganges, which flows over a thousand miles away, hence its name, Banganga, the Ganga created on a baan (arrow).[5]

The Banganga also houses the 'Shri Kashi Math' and 'Shri Kaivalya or Kawle Math' of the Goud Saraswat Brahmins at its banks and samadhis of their various past heads of the Math.[6]

The area also has a Hindu cremation ground[7] which after 2003, received a makeover to house a Gas crematorium.[8]

The area still has an old Hindu cemetery consisting of samadhi shrines of various Advaita gurus, such as Sri Siddarameshwar Maharaj (1888–1936) and his disciple, Sri Ranjit Maharaj (1913–2000).[9][10]

The tank today is a rectangular pool structure surrounded by steps on all four sides. At the entrance are two pillars in which oil lamps called diyas were lit in ancient times.

The tank, as well as the main Walkeshwar Temple and the Parshuram Temple belong to the Goud Saraswat Temple Trust, which once owned most of the property in the complex. Many Goud Saraswat Brahmin families (Rege, Anaokar, Mulgaonkar, Kenkre, Sakhardande, Sukthankar, Keni, Marudkar, Naik, Wartikar, Warerkar, Bidikar, Bhende, Prabhawalkar, Pagnis) used to reside / still reside in the Temple Trust buildings in the complex.

The tank is spring fed and so its water remains sweet, despite being located only a few dozen meters away from the sea. Apart from being a cultural hub, the place over the years has provided inspiration to many artists, be it on film or on canvas.


Simon Peter or Cephas, the first Pope, Prince of the Apostles, and founder, with St. Paul, of the See of Rome. Peter was a native of Bethsaida, near Lake Tiberias, the son of John, and worked, like his brother St. Andrew, as a fisherman on Lake Genesareth. Andrew introduced Peter to Jesus, and Christ called Peter to become a disciple.

In Luke is recounted the story that Peter caught so large an amount of fish that he fell down before the feet of Jesus and was told by the Lord, “Do not be afraid; from now on you will be catching men”.

Jesus also gave Simon a new name: Cephas, or the rock. Becoming a disciple of Jesus, Peter acknowledged him as “…the Messiah, the son of the living God”. Christ responded by saying: “…you are Peter and upon this rock I will build my church… He added: “I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven. Whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven; and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven”.

Peter was always listed as the first of the Apostles in all of the New Testament accounts and was a member of the inner circle of Jesus, with James and John.

He is recorded more than any other disciple, and was at Jesus’ side at the Transfiguration, the raising of Jairus’ daughter, and the Agony of the Garden of Gethsemane. He helped organize the Last Supper and played a major role in the events of the Passion. When the Master was arrested, he cut off the right ear of a slave of the high priest Malchus and then denied Christ three times as the Lord predicted. Peter then “went out and began to weep bitterly”. After the Resurrection, Peter went to the tomb with the “other disciple” after being told of the event by the women. The first appearance of the Risen Christ was before Peter, ahead of the other disciples, and when the Lord came before the disciples at Tiberias, he gave to Peter the famous command to “Feed my lambs… Tend my sheep… Feed my sheep”.

In the time immediately after the Ascension, Peter stood as the unquestionable head of the Apostles, his position made evident in the Acts. He appointed the replacement of Judas Iscariot; he spoke first to the crowds that had assembled after the descent of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost; he was the first Apostle to perform miracles in the name of the Lord; and he rendered judgment upon the deceitful Ananias and Sapphira.

Peter was instrumental in bringing the Gospel to the Gentiles. He baptized the Roman pagan Cornelius, and at the Council of Jerusalem he gave his support to preaching to Gentiles, thereby permitting the new Church to become universal. Imprisoned by King Herod Agrippa, he was aided in an escape by an angel. He then resumed his apostolate in Jerusalem and his missionary efforts included travels to such cities of the pagan world as Antioch, Corinth, and eventually Rome. He made reference to the Eternal City in his first Epistle by noting that he writes from Babylon.

It is certain that Peter died in Rome and that his martyrdom came during the reign of Emperor Nero, probably in 64. Testimony of his martyrdom is extensive, including Origen, Eusebius of Caesarea, St. Clement I of Rome, St. Ignatius, and St. Irenaeus. According to rich tradition, Peter was crucified on the Vatican Hill upside down because he declared himself unworthy to die in the same manner as the Lord. He was then buried on Vatican Hill, and excavations under St. Peter’s Basilica have unearthed his probable tomb, and his relics are now enshrined under the high altar of St. Peter’s.

From the earliest days of the Church, Peter was recognized as the Prince of the Apostles and the first Supreme Pontiff; his see, Rome, has thus enjoyed the position of primacy over the entire Catholic Church. While Peter’s chief feast day is June 29, he is also honored on February 22 and November 18. In liturgical art, he is depicted as an elderly man holding a key and a book. His symbols include an inverted cross, a boat, and the rooster.

Navratri Khamkhya Temple Assam

Courtesy Jyoti A Deka Guwahati