Thursday, April 28, 2011

TUM NA JANE KIS JAHA ME KHO GAYE

picture shot by late prof bw jatkar


182,540 items / 1,438,765 views

www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-HG4UYwPgU&feature=related


Tum Na Jane Kis Jaha Mein Kho Gaye Lyrics

Film: Sazaa (1951)

Tum na jane kis jahan mein kho gaye
Tum na jane kis jahan mein kho gaye
Hum bhari duniya mein tanha ho gaye
Tum na jane kis jahan mein kho gaye

Maut bhi aati nahin saans bhi jaati nahin
Dil ko yeh kya ho gaya koi sahi bhati nahin
Loot kar mera jahan chup gaye hon tum kaha
Loot kar mera jahan chup gaye hon tum kaha
Tum kaha, tum kaha, tum kaha

Tum na jane kis jahan mein kho gaye

Ek jaan aur laakh ghum gooth ke reh jaye na dum
Aaon tum ko dekhle doobti nazaron se hum
Loot kar mera jahan chup gaye hon tum kaha
Loot kar mera jahan chup gaye hon tum kaha
Tum kaha, tum kaha, tum kaha

Tum na jane kis jahan mein kho gaye
Hum bhari duniya mein tanha ho gaye
Tum na jane kis jahan mein kho gaye

Once Upon A Time There Was A Warrior Goddess Queen

182,540 items / 1,438,567 views

beautiful
divine
hardly seen
she always hid
behind
a ghostly
silver screen
she loved to cook
haleem kebabs
lots of green
a beggar poet
fell in love
with her
kohle laden eyes
Cleopatra nose
gazelle like neck
her porcelain skin
she became his muse
his lifes existence
to her chagrin
she was mad
at his audacity
she turned
him into a
babys napkin
hung
him to dry
on clothesline
with a clothes pin
falling in
love with
her divinity
was one of
the greatest sins
so on the clothesline
he takes a royal spin
sometimes in love
you can however
never win
broken dreams
from within
now he could have
won her hand her heart
if he was a djinn
but he was human
wrote paeans
of her beauty
this village
bumpkin
his love
he could
not trade in
beggarly
demeanor
covered in
calfskin

a tale of
sorrow
there in
from
her mystical kingdom
called facebook
he was self exiled
kicked on the shin
her memories
his means of survival
a beggar poet
through
thick and thin

uff
ab ap chup karen
into her heart
she wont let him in
her corrugated heart
made of tin

The Silhouette of the Hijab


182,540 items / 1,438,549 views

These are two beggar girls and their brother who were begging at Bandra Hill Road and followed me to my work place, they were from a suburb called Mumbra they told me, I gave the some money but also took these shots to show you survival on the mean streets of despair...

Forgiveness Is What I Seek

182,496 items / 1,437,816 views

Silence is golden
even though
you dont speak
i offer you my
other cheek
the spirit was willing
my flesh was weak
only memories
held to my beak
from the cage of
friendship
you did sneak
a poet choked
on a bloody creek

zindagi besuri
kuch nahi theek

Even Poets Deserve A Second Chance

182,491 items / 1,437,787 views

we all make
mistakes
when we romance
illusions that leap
flirt and dance
poets too go
in a trance
falter fall deserve
a second chance
its through
forgiveness
humility
our parents
wishes blessings
we enhance
in life on a journey
as we advance

Beggar Poets Angst


182,466 items / 1,437,730 views


she
has
thrown him out shut the door
corroded at the core nothing
she owes she wants him no
more his poetry
to her stifled soul a bore
she has gone silent
ever more
as the beggar poet
hits the floor broken
dreams blisters
on his feet as sores
hot water on his
hopes she pours
a poem of love
distant shores
broken wings
folklore
deactivated
on her cosmic
consciousness
a whimper a roar


today she has an appointment with the doctor i hope pray her body her heart her soul recovers.. peace hope happiness she once more discovers...a friend who could not be a lover ...

Spilled Grain Story of My Life

A Dream That Broke



everything over
just a few
strands of hair
her memories
when i awoke
a beggar poet
always broke
a gazelle
neck
i could not
touch
or stroke
only a friendly
facebook poke
that too deactivated
finally choked
tears soaked
permission
revoked
a power bubble
sweet memories
evoke come
back the heart invokes
to a beggar poet
heart broke

Indian Woman

My Frugal Breakfast Rs 10

Once Upon A Time In Bandra

Heart Broken Asshole

Lost World of Old Bandra

Sayings of Jesus on the cross

182,466 items / 1,437,692 views

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There are seven expressions traditionally attributed to Jesus during his crucifixion, gathered from the four Canonical Gospels.[1][2] Three of the sayings appear exclusively in the Gospel of Luke and three appear exclusively in the Gospel of John. The other saying appears both in the Gospel of Mark and the Gospel of Matthew.[3] In Mark and Matthew, Jesus cries out to God. In Luke, he forgives his killers, reassures the good thief, and commends his spirit to the Father. In John, he speaks to his mother, says he thirsts, and declares the end of his earthly life.

Since the 16th century these sayings have been widely used in the preachings on Good Friday and entire books have been written on the theological analysis, and the devotional elements of the seven sayings.[3][4][5][6]

Physicians and scientists who have studied the medical aspects of the crucifixion concluded that the sayings had to be short because crucifixion causes asphyxia. This makes inhaling air to speak difficult and painful, especially as death approaches.[7][8][9][10]

The seven sayings tradition is an example of the Christian approach to the construction of a Gospel harmony, in which material from different Gospels is combined, producing an account that goes beyond each Gospel.[11][3] James Dunn considers the sayings as are part of the elaborations in the diverse retellings of Jesus' final hours.[12]


The seven sayings form part of a Christian meditation that is often used during Lent, Holy Week and Good Friday. The traditional order of the sayings is:[13]

1. Father forgive them, for they know not what they do (Luke 23:34).
2. Truly, I say to you, today you will be with me in paradise (Luke 23:43).
3. Woman, behold your son: behold your mother (John 19:26-27).
4. My God, My God, why have you forsaken me, (Matthew 27:46 and Mark 15:34).
5. I thirst (John 19:28).
6. It is finished (John 19:30).
7. Father, into your hands I commit my spirit (Luke 23:46).

Traditionally, these seven sayings are called words of 1. Forgiveness, 2. Salvation, 3. Relationship, 4. Abandonment, 5. Distress, 6. Triumph and 7. Reunion.[14]

As can be seen from the above list, not all seven sayings can be found in any one account of Jesus' crucifixion. The ordering is a harmonisation of the texts from each of the four canonical gospels. In the gospels of Matthew and Mark, Jesus is quoted in Aramaic, shouting the fourth phrase only, and cries out wordlessly before dying. In Luke's Gospel, the first, second, and seventh sayings occur. The third, fifth and sixth sayings can only be found in John's Gospel. In other words:

* In Matthew and Mark :
o My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?
* In Luke:
o Father forgive them, for they know not what they do
o Truly, I say to you, today you will be with me in paradise (in response to one of the two thieves crucified next to him)
o Father, into your hands I commit my spirit (last words)
* In John:
o Woman, behold your son: behold your mother (directed at Mary, the mother of Jesus, either as a self reference, or as a reference to the beloved disciple and an instruction to the disciple himself)
o I thirst (just before a wetted sponge, mentioned by all the Canonical Gospels, is offered)
o It is finished (last words)

[edit] Father forgive them, for they know not what they do

Luke 23:34

Then Jesus said, "Father forgive them, for they know not what they do".

This first saying of Jesus on the cross is traditionally called "The Word of Forgiveness".[14] It is theologically interpreted as Jesus' prayer for forgiveness for those who were crucifying him: the Roman soldiers, and apparently for all others who were involved in his crucifixion.[15][16][17][18] However, many early manuscripts omit Luke 23:34.[19]
[edit] Today you will be with me in paradise

Luke 23:43

And he said to him, "Truly, I say to you, today you will be with me in paradise".

This saying is traditionally called "The Word of Salvation".[14] According to Luke's Gospel, Jesus was crucified between two thieves, one of whom supports Jesus' innocence and asks him to remember him when he comes into his kingdom. Jesus replies, "Truly, I say to you..." (ἀμήν λέγω σοί, amēn legō soi), followed with the only appearance of the word "paradise" in the Gospels (παραδείσω, paradeisō, from the Persian pairidaeza "paradise garden").
[edit] Behold your son: behold your mother

John 19:26-27

Jesus saw his own mother, and the disciple standing near whom he loved, he said to his mother, "Woman, behold your son". Then he said to the disciple, "Behold your mother". And from that hour, he took his mother into his family.

This statement is traditionally called "The Word of Relationship" and in it Jesus entrusts Mary, his mother, into the care of a disciple.[14]
[edit] My God, my God, why have you forsaken me

Matthew 27:46

Around the ninth hour, Jesus shouted in a loud voice, saying "Eli Eli lama sabachthani?" which is, "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?"

Mark 15:34

And at the ninth hour, Jesus shouted in a loud voice, "Eloi Eloi lama sabachthani?" which is translated, "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?"

This saying is traditionally called "The Word of Abandonment" and is the only saying that appears in more than one Gospel.[14] This saying is given in Aramaic with a translation (originally in Greek) after it. This phrase is the opening line of Psalm 22, a psalm about persecution, the mercy and salvation of God. It was common for people at this time to reference songs by quoting their first lines. In the verses immediately following this saying, in both Gospels, the onlookers who hear Jesus' cry understand him to be calling for help from Elijah (Eliyyâ). The slight differences between the two gospel accounts are most probably due to dialect. Matthew's version seems to have been more influenced by Hebrew, whereas Mark's is perhaps more colloquial.

The phrase could be either:

* אלי אלי למה עזבתני [ēlî ēlî lamâ azavtanî]; or
* אלי אלי למא שבקתני [ēlî ēlî lamâ šabaqtanî]; or
* אלהי אלהי למא שבקתני [ēlâhî ēlâhî lamâ šabaqtanî]

The Aramaic word šabaqtanî is based on the verb šabaq, 'to allow, to permit, to forgive, and to forsake', with the perfect tense ending -t (2nd person singular: 'you'), and the object suffix -anî (1st person singular: 'me').[20]

A. T. Robertson noted that the "so-called Gospel of Peter 1.5 preserves this saying in a Docetic (Cerinthian) form: 'My power, my power, thou hast forsaken me!'"[21]
[edit] I thirst

John 19:28

He said, "I thirst".

This statement is traditionally called "The Word of Distress" and is compared and contrasted with the encounter of Jesus with the Samaritan Woman at the Well in John 4:4-26.[14]
[edit] It is finished

John 19:30

Jesus said, "It is finished".

This statement is traditionally called "The Word of Triumph" and is theologically interpreted as the announcement of the end of the earthly life of Jesus, in anticipation for the Resurrection.[14]
[edit] Father, into your hands I commit my spirit

Luke 23:46

And speaking in a loud voice, Jesus said, "Father, into your hands I commit my spirit".

This saying, which is an announcement and not a request, is traditionally called "The Word of Reunion" and is theologically interpreted as the proclamation of Jesus joining the God the Father in Heaven.[14]
[edit] Theological interpretations

The last words of Jesus have been the subject of a wide range of Christian teachings and sermons, and a number of authors have written books specifically devoted to the last sayings of Christ.[22][23][24]

Priest and author Timothy Radcliffe states that in the Bible, seven is the number of perfection, and he views the seven last words as God's completion of the circle of creation and performs analysis of the structure of the seven last words to obtain further insight.[25]
[edit] Historicity of the sayings

James Dunn considers the seven sayings weakly rooted in tradition and sees them as a part of the elaborations in the diverse retellings of Jesus' final hours.[12] Dunn, however, argues in favor of the authenticity of the Mark/Matthew saying in that by presenting Jesus as seeing himself 'forsaken' it would have been an embarrassment to the early Church, and hence would not have been invented.[12] Geza Vermes, states that the first saying from (Mark and Matthew) is a quotation from Psalm 22, and is therefore occasionally seen as a theological and literary device employed by the writers.[26] According to Vermes, attempts to interpret the expression as a hopeful reference to scripture provide indirect evidence that it is an authentic cry of despair.[27] Leslie Houlden, on the other hand, states that Luke may have deliberately excluded the Mark/Matthew saying from his Gospel because it did not fit in the model of Jesus he was presenting.[3

I Grieve In Silence

182,466 items / 1,437,692 views

in my prison cell
diabetic disharmony
hopes not well
blisters
on my heart my feet
a smelly cats
heart
i tried to bell
a pain
remembered
on my soul
it swells
out
of a distant
heaven
i created
my own hell
thoughts
of agony
i try to quell
i am too
scared to ring
her trembling
doorbell
i have been
used abused
duly
expelled
a broken clay pot
oozing blood
a broken dream shell

I Am Happy She Has Left Me And Gone

182,466 items / 1,437,692 views

a new awakening
hopes unborn
the twilight of my
life forgotten
fucked dawn
poetry pawned
love she had
spawned
my soul
had warned
she would
cock tease
soon be gone
nature
of woman
to be loved
to be scorned
eternal friendship
undeleted forever
i was such a
greenhorn
falling in love
with a warrior
queen goddess
a divine beauty
highborn
lost moments
betrayed
moments
i reflect sadly
i mourn
a page
had created
from the womb
of my misery
a page
she has torn
leaving behind
a pain stillborn

A Poets Cosmic Soul Grilled Raw And Tender

182,387 items / 1,437,482 views

my love
will always defend her
from the frying pan
into the fire
grilled raw and tender
what god put together
my poetry put asunder
her anger her thunder
yes falling in love
was my Himalayan blunder
why why why i wonder


to her wily charms
her innocence
a part of me surrendered

tum takalluf ko bhi ikhlas samajhtay ho faraz dost hota nahi har hath milanay wala

182,385 items / 1,437,472 views


aisa dost jo dost ko bhuljanewala...woh toh chal diye dosti par laga ke tala...

a beggar poet encaged

182,385 items / 1,437,438 views

overnight
his hair
turned
snow white
he aged
locked
in a coffin like cell
a poet encaged
in pain enraged
with a sledgehammer
like blow on his poetic
consciousness
his sense
of modesty
his humility
his dignity
she outraged
a war on the
soul of his poetry
passion pathos
she engaged

Your Facebook Account Has Been Deactivated

182,384 items / 1,437,406 views

far from
a madding crowd
i dont need
to poke her
on her wall
scream or shout
from facebook duly
deactivated i am out
a beggar poet
a flickering flame
in black out
from the dungeon
of her heart
shut out
i pulled out
to secure
my sanity
from within
without
an empty kettle
steaming spout
washed out
i dropped out
burnished poems
on sepia tinted
print out
her pain
becomes
unbearable
when the
computer blinks
lights
go out


page cannot
be displayed
says the lay out


This content is currently unavailable
The page you requested cannot be displayed right now. It may be temporarily unavailable, the link you clicked on may have expired, or you may not have permission to view this page.

when in doubt
a link timed out

firoze shakir
photographerno1
from facebook
phased out
in his old hide out
like haleem
kebabs
totally
overcooked
burnt out
in total rout
she rolls eyes
shuts mouth
dumb
childish
stupid
that's
what
she is
about

arrogant
conceited
pompous
pillow lips
puckered
pout
from
facebook
she
forced
me out

One Day We Will Surely Meet

182,383 items / 1,437,393 views

on mumbai streets
a warrior queen goddess
a beggar poet barefeet
a goddess who stole
his fire stole his heartbeat
oh she hates cheats
doublecrossers
she loves to delete
memories bitter and sweet
on a simmering fire pre heat
oh come back says the poet
do not retreat you win
i accept defeat
he entreats hidden
in the grave in a
winding sheet
pathos poetry passion
personal off beat
to be a friend not a lover
he repeats her shadow
on his soul demure petite

One Day We Will Surely Meet

182,383 items / 1,437,393 views

on mumbai streets
a warrior queen goddess
a beggar poet barefeet
a goddess who stole
his fire stole his heartbeat
oh she hates cheats
doublecrossers
she loves to delete
memories bitter and sweet
on a simmering fire pre heat
oh come back says the poet
do not retreat you win
i accept defeat
he entreats hidden
in the grave in a
winding sheet
pathos poetry passion
personal off beat
to be a friend not a lover
he repeats her shadow
on his soul demure petite

Fashion Goes Out Of Style - Style Never Goes Out Of Passion

She Has Flown The Coop

182,381 items / 1,437,242 views

leaving me
my pain
my sorrow
in my rusty cage
a sudden
separation
now seems
an age
on the soul
of my humanity
a war
she waged
a coup
she staged
i am out
of facebook
no more
on her
favorite page
what i feel
she will never
gauge her
silence
on rampage
life is nothing
but a revolving
stage karmic
chaos pathos
poetry passion
fate enraged

Madonna and Child

182,380 items / 1,437,220 views


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


The Madonna and Child or The Virgin and Child is often the name of a work of art which shows the Virgin Mary and the Child Jesus. The word Madonna means "My Lady" in Italian. Artworks of the Christ Child and his mother Mary are part of the Roman Catholic tradition in many parts of the world including Italy, Spain, Portugal, France, South America and the Philippines. Paintings known as icons are also an important tradition of the Orthodox Church and often show the Mary and the Christ Child. They are found particularly in Eastern Europe, Russia, Egypt, the Middle East and India


Works of art which show the Madonna and Child can be paintings or sculptures. Some paintings are very large and show the Madonna on a throne, with saints standing around it. These paintings are altarpieces; they are designed to go above the altar in a church.

In some churches, particularly in Italy and in Eastern Orthodox Churches, there are many wall paintings and mosaics of the Madonna and Child.

Most Madonna and Child paintings are small. They have been painted for private owners and would usually have been kept in houses. They might be hung on the wall above a table where flowers and candles could be placed to honour the Virgin Mary. Most of the famous ones are now in art galleries.


Many Catholic churches have statues of the Virgin Mary with the Christ Child, These are sometimes life-sized and are painted, with real hair and glass eyes so that they look lifelike.

Other statues of the Madonna and Child are very small. In the Middle Ages small statues were carved from ivory. These precious statues are often very beautifully and delicately made. They can often be seen in museums.

In Florence in the early 1400s, an artist called Luca della Robbia began making terracotta statues and sculptured altarpieces from clay, which were fired and glazed with colours, most often blue and white, but also purple, green and yellow. This family business lasted for 120 years.

Many statues of the Madonna and Child may be factory-made and sold as souvenirs. This tradition of small statues has been around for hundreds of years. Many of them were made in artist's workshops in the Early Renaissance
[change] Icons

In the Orthodox Church, there is also a long tradition of painting images of the Virgin Mary with the Christ Child. These pictures, which are often quite small and are painted on wooden panels, are often very careful copies of particular famous icons. This tradition continues to the present day.

She Used Me Abused Me


182,379 items / 1,437,193 views

with sweet nothings
her chatter banter
she amused me
with a magical
love potion
she enthused me
she confused me
to get rid of her
pain her wounds
maimed me
bruised me
abused me
misused me
her work over
she threw me out
out on the streets
happy at the thought
a deleted dream
she had used me
a poetic pain
suffused me
uncontrollable
sobs accused me
with a long pause
she excused me

I Shut my Facebook Account ,, Targeted Shia Harassment

27 May 2018 As a Shia I am targeted even  by  Sufis Sufism that  I promoted vigorously as a Malang .. I have renounced my Malang...