Saturday, November 10, 2012

You Wont See This Street Slum Colony It Has Been Totally Destroyed



I shot this on 6 November and , this evening while going to town I passed it in my cab, it has been completely reduced to rubble by the Municipally I took some rapid shots from the cab will post them later ...

And perhaps they were illegally on public land close to Dagdi Chawl.. and now nothing remains ..

Khal Yahaan, Basti Thi Khusiyaan, Aaj Hai, Maatum Bahaar,
Waqt Laaya Tha, Bahaaren, Waqt Laaya Hai Kiza.

the city where I have lived for 59 years ... has changed me poetically

Mumbai - We Make It Visible

teri duniya mein dil lagta nahi waapas bula le main sajde mein gira hoon

mujh ko aye maalik utha le

mardon ne banaayeen jo rasmein unko haq ka farmaan kahaa aurat ke zinda jalne ko qurbaani aur balidaan kahaa

Aurat ne janam diya mardon ko
mardon ne usey baazaar diya
jab jee chaaha masla kuchla
jab jee chaaha dhutkaar diya
aurat ne janam diya mardon ko
tultee hai kaheen deenaaron mein
bikti hai kaheen baazaaron mein
nangee nachwaayee jaati hai
aiyaashon ke darbaaron mein
ye wo be-izzat cheez hai jo
bant jaati hai izzatdaaron mein
aurat ne janam diya mardon ko
mardon ke liye har zulm rawaan
aurat ke liye ronaa bhi khataa
mardon ke liye laakhon sejein
aurat ke liye bas ek chitaa
mardon ke liye har aish ka haq
aurat ke liye jeena bhi sazaa
aurat ne janam diya mardon ko
jin honthon ne inko pyaar kiya
un honthon ka vyopaar kiya
jis kokh mein inka jism dhalaa
us kokh ka kaarobaar kiya
jis tan se ugey konpal ban kar
us tan ko jaleelo khaar kiya
aurat ne janam diya mardon ko
mardon ne banaayeen jo rasmein
unko haq ka farmaan kahaa
aurat ke zinda jalne ko
qurbaani aur balidaan kahaa
ismat ke badley roti di
aur usko bhi ehsaan kahaa
aurat ne janam diya mardon ko
sansaar ki har ek besharmi
gurbat ki god mein palti hai
chaklon hi mein aakar rukti hai
phaakon se jo raah nikalti hai
mardon ki hawas hai jo aksar
aurat ke paap mein dhalti hai
aurat ne janam diya mardon ko
aurat sansaar ki kismat hai
phir bhi taqdeer ki heti hai
awtaar payambar janti hai
phir bhi shaitaan ki beti hai
ye wo badkismat maa hai jo
beton ki sej pe leti hai
aurat ne janam diya mardon ko
mardon ne usey baazaar diya
jab jee chaaha masla kuchla
jab jee chaaha dhutkaar diya
aurat ne janam diya mardon ko

atulsongaday.me/2011/03/08/aurat-ne-janam-diyaa-mardon-ko/

The Girl Child Is The Most Precious Gift To Humanity

The Creative Pout

I had scolded her
without a shout
she looked at me
with this creative pout
hugging her
I ended
this unequal bout
me and my big mouth...

Here Comes The Claw

title courtesy metaverse3

here comes the claw
a crooked hand
of her grand pa
threatening her
four teeth jaw
of this beauty
without a flaw
she says its the
last straw
she shouts out
to her garrulous
grand ma
who tells me
to withdraw
yes its a woman's world
me since marriage
an outlaw
home where
her edict runs
as unwritten law

Marziya Shakir A Gift Of Gifts


when we
are down
our souls
she lifts

To King Khan From Metaverse ..

Shah Rukh Khan..

Look inside your million dollar makaan..
Ask what you have done for your fellow insaan..
Money is more than for dhoom-dhaam...
First tenet of being musalmaan..
Think it over....have a paan !

Jesus is Perplexed

In Mumbai Even A Street Wall Is Home Sweet Home ..

Diwali ki Shubhkamnayein (दिवाली की शुभकामनाएं) Phatakre Kam Phodein Toh Bat Ban Jaye



From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Diwali (also spelled Devali in certain regions) or Deepavali,[note 1] popularly known as the "festival of lights," is a five day festival which starts on Dhanteras, celebrated on thirteenth lunar day of Krishna paksha (dark fortnight) of the Hindu calendar month Ashwin and ends on Bhaubeej, celebrated on second lunar day of Shukla paksha (bright fortnight) of the Hindu calendar month Kartik. In the Gregorian calendar, Diwali falls between mid-October and mid-November.
Diwali is an official holiday in India,[1] Nepal, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Mauritius, Guyana, Trinidad & Tobago, Suriname, Malaysia, Singapore and Fiji.
For Hindus, Diwali is one of the most important festivals of the year and is celebrated in families by performing traditional activities together in their homes. For Jains, Diwali marks the attainment of moksha or nirvana by Mahavira in 527 BCE.[2][3]
The name "Diwali" or "Divali" is a contraction of "Deepavali" (Sanskrit: दीपावली Dīpāvalī), which translates into "row of lamps".[4] Diwali involves the lighting of small clay lamps (dīpa in Sanskrit: दीप) filled with oil to signify the triumph of good over evil.[5] These lamps are kept on during the night and one's house is cleaned, both done in order to make the goddess Lakshmi feel welcome.[6] Firecrackers are burst in order to drive away evil spirits.[7][8][9] During Diwali, all the celebrants wear new clothes and share sweets and snacks with family members and friends.
Diwali commemorates the return of Lord Rama, along with Sita and Lakshmana, from his 14-year-long exile and vanquishing the demon-king Ravana. In joyous celebration of the return of their king, the people of Ayodhya, the Capital of Rama, illuminated the kingdom with earthen diyas and by bursting firecrackers.[10]
The festival starts with Dhanteras on which most Indian business communities begin their financial year. The second day of the festival, Naraka Chaturdasi, marks the vanquishing of the demon Naraka by Lord Krishna and his wife Satyabhama. Amavasya, the third day of Diwali, marks the worship of Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth in her most benevolent mood, fulfilling the wishes of her devotees. Amavasya also tells the story of Lord Vishnu, who in his dwarf incarnation vanquished the Bali, and banished him to Patala. It is on the fourth day of Diwali, Kartika Shudda Padyami, that Bali went to patala and took the reins of his new kingdom in there. The fifth day is referred to as Yama Dvitiya (also called Bhai Dooj), and on this day sisters invite their brothers to their homes

It begins in late Ashvin (between September and October) and ends in early Kartika (between October and November). The days in Ashvin are in the Krishna Paksha ("dark fortnight") of that month, while the days in Kartik are in its Shukla Paksha ("bright fortnight"). The first day is Dhan Teras. The last day is Yama Dvitiya, which signifies the second day of the light half of Kartika. Each day of Diwali marks one celebration of the six principal stories associated with the festival.
Hindus have several significant events associated with Diwali:
The return of Rama after 14 years of Vanvas (exile). To welcome his return, diyas (ghee lamps) were lit in rows of 20.
The killing of Narakasura: Celebrated as Naraka Chaturdashi, one day before Diwali, it commemorates the killing of the evil demon Narakasura, who wreaked havoc. Krishna's wife Satyabhama killed Narakasura during the Dwapara yuga. In another version of the belief, the demon was killed by Krishna or Krishna provoked his wife Satyabhama to kill Narshna, defeating Indradebated with the villagers about what their 'dharma' truly was. They were farmers, they should do their duty and concentrate on farming and protection of their cattle. He said that all human beings should do their 'karma' to the best of their ability and not pray for natural phenomenon. The villagers were convinced by Krishna, and did not proceed with the special puja (prayer). Indra was then angered, and flooded the village. Krishna lifted Mount Govardhan and held it up to protect the people and cattle from the rain. Indra finally accepted defeat and recognized Krishna as supreme. Although this aspect of Krishna's life is sometimes ignored[citation needed] it sets up the basis of the 'karma' philosophy later detailed in the Bhagavat Gita.
Other events associated with Diwali include:

Return of Pandavas after 12 years of Vanvas and one year of agyatavas (living incognito).

Diwali celebrations are spread over five days, from Dhanteras to Bhaiduj. In some places like Maharashtra it starts with Vasu Baras. All the days except Diwali are named according to their designation in the Hindu calendar. The days are:
Govatsa Dwadashi or Vasu Baras (27 Ashvin or 12 Krishna Paksha Ashvin): Go means cow and vatsa means calf. Dwadashi or Baras means the 12th day. On this day the cow and calf are worshiped. The story associated with this day is that of King Prithu, son of the tyrant King Vena. Due to the ill rule of Vena, there was a terrible famine and earth stopped being fruitful. Prithu chased the earth, who is usually represented as cow, and ‘milked’ her, meaning that he brought prosperity to the land.
Dhanatrayodashi or Dhan teras or Dhanwantari Triodasi (28 Ashvin or 13 Krishna Paksha Ashvin): Dhana means wealth and Trayodashi means 13th day. This day falls on the 13th day of the second half of the lunar month. It is considered an auspicious day for buying utensils and gold, hence the name ‘Dhana’. This day is regarded as the Jayanti (Birth Anniversary) of God Dhanvantari, the Physician of Gods, who came out during Samudra manthan, the churning of the great ocean by the gods and the demons.
Naraka Chaturdashi (29 Ashvin or 14 Krishna Paksha Ashvin): Chaturdashi is the 14th day This was the day on which the demon Narakasura was killed by Krishna – an incarnation of Vishnu. It signifies the victory of good over evil and light over darkness (Gujarati: Kali Chaudas, Rajasthan : Roop Chaudas). In southern India, this is the actual day of festivities. Hindus wake up before dawn, have a fragrant oil bath and dress in new clothes. They light small lamps all around the house and draw elaborate kolams /rangolis outside their homes. They perform a special puja with offerings to Krishna or Vishnu, as he liberated the world from the demon Narakasura on this day. It is believed that taking a bath before sunrise, when the stars are still visible in the sky is equivalent to taking a bath in the holy Ganges. After the puja, children burst firecrackers heralding the defeat of the demon. As this is a day of rejoicing, many will have very elaborate breakfasts and lunches and meet family and friends.
Lakshmi Puja (30 Ashvin or 15 Krishna Paksha Ashvin): Lakshmi Puja marks the most important day of Diwali celebrations in North India. Hindu homes worship Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, and Ganesh, the God of auspicious beginnings, and then light lamps in the streets and homes to welcome prosperity and well-being.
Bali Pratipada and Govardhan Puja (1 Kartika or 1 Shukla Paksha Kartika) : In North India, this day is celebrated as Govardhan Puja, also called Annakoot, and is celebrated as the day Krishna – an incarnation of god Vishnu – defeated Indra and by the lifting of Govardhana hill to save his kinsmen and cattle from rain and floods. For Annakoot, large quantities of food are decorated symbolizing the Govardhan hill lifted by Krishna. In Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu and Karnataka, it is celebrated as Bali-Pratipada or Bali Padyami. The day commemorates the victory of Vishnu in his dwarf form Vamana over the demon-king Bali, who was pushed into the patala. In Maharashtra, it is called Padava or Nava Diwas (new day). Men present gifts to their wives on this day. It is celebrated as the first day of the Vikram Samvat calendar, in Gujarat.
Yama Dwitiya or Bhaiduj (also Bhayyaduj, Bhaubeej or Bhayitika) (2 Kartika or 2 Shukla Paksha Kartika): on this day, brothers and sisters meet to express love and affection for each other (Gujarati: Bhai Bij, Bengali: Bhai Phota). It is based on a story when Yama, lord of Death, visited his sister Yami (the river Yamuna). Yami welcomed Yama with an Aarti and they had a feast together. Yama gave a gift to Yami while leaving as a token of his appreciation. So, the day is also called 'YAMA DWITIYA'. Brothers visit their sisters’ place on this day and usually have a meal there, and also give gifts to their sisters
[edit]Goddess Lakshmi Puja
Main article: Lakshmi Puja
Diwali marks the end of the harvest season in most of India. Farmers give thanks for the bounty of the year gone by, and pray for a good harvest for the year to come. Traditionally this marked the closing of accounts for businesses dependent on the agrarian cycle, and is the last major celebration before winter. Lakshmi symbolizes wealth and prosperity, and her blessings are invoked for a good year ahead.
There are two legends that associate the worship of Lakshmi on this day. According to the first legend, on this day, Lakshmi emerged from Kshira Sagar, the Ocean of Milk, during the great churning of the oceans, Samudra manthan. The second legend (more popular in western India) relates to the Vamana avatar of the big three Vishnu, the incarnation he assumed to kill the demon king Bali. On this day, Vishnu came back to his abode the Vaikuntha; so those who worship Lakshmi receive the benefit of her benevolent mood, and are blessed with mental, physical and material well-being.[11]
As per spiritual references, on this day "Lakshmi-panchayatan" enters the Universe. Vishnu, Indra, Kubera, Gajendra and Lakshmi are elements of this "panchayatan" (a group of five). The tasks of these elements are:
Lakshmi: Divine Energy (Shakti) which provides energy to all the above activities.
Vishnu: Happiness (happiness and satisfaction)
Kubera: Wealth (generosity; one who shares wealth)
Indra: Opulence (satisfaction due to wealth)
Gajendra: Carries the wealth
Saraswati: Knowledge
Diwali is not only celebrated by hindu's it is also a Sikh festival and sikh's celebrate diwali for different reasons. Hindu's celebrate diwali because of the ram sita story however sikh's celebrate diwali as for sikh's diwali marks the chhorh Divis this was when the sixth guru , Guru Hargobind ji relaesed 52 hindi kings out of prison.

Diwali greetings in some languages

Deepavali Habbada Shubhashayagalu (ದೀಪಾವಳಿ ಹಬ್ಬದ ಶುಭಾಷಯಗಳು): Greeting in Kannada
Subha Dipawali ki mangalmaya subha kaamanaa (शुभ दिपावली की मंगलमय शुभ-कामना): Greeting in Nepali
Diwali ki Shubhkamnayein (दिवाली की शुभकामनाएं): Greeting in Hindi
Diwadi ni khub khub Shubhkamnao / Saal Mubarak: Greeting in Gujarati
Tuhanu diwali diyan boht boht vadhaiyan (ਤੁਹਾਨੂੰ ਦਿਵਾਲੀ ਦੀਆਂ ਬਹੁਤ ਬਹੁਤ ਵਧਾਈਆਂ ਹੋਣ ): Greeting in Punjabi
Diwali Mubarak Ho Aap Savke (दिवाली मुबारक होआप सव के ): Greeting in Bhojpuri
Deepavali Aashamsagal ( ദീപാവലി ആശംസകള്‍ ): Greeting in Malayalam.
Deepavali Nalvazhthukal (தீபாவளி நல்வாழ்த்துகள்) :Greeting in Tamil
Deepavali Shubhakankshalu (దీపావళి శుభాకా౦క్షలు) :Greeting in Telugu
Diwalichya hardik Shubhechha (दिवाळीच्या हार्दिक शुभेच्छा ): Greeting in Marathi
Subho Deepabalir Preeti O Subechsha (শুভ দীপাবলীর প্রীতি ও শুভেচ্ছা) :Greeting in Bengali
"Happy Diwali!" :Greeting in English language
Diwali ki shubh kamna:Greeting in Hindi (Bundelkhand)
Deepavalira Anek Shubhechha (ଦୀପାବଳିର ଅନେକ ଶୁଭେଛା) :Greeting in Oriya
Diwali mubarak ho aap sabko:Greeting in Hindi (Bhind)
[edit]Spiritual significance

While Diwali is popularly known as the "festival of lights", the most significant spiritual meaning is "the awareness of the inner light". Central to Hindu philosophy is the assertion that there is something beyond the physical body and mind which is pure, infinite, and eternal, called the Atman. The celebration of Diwali as the "victory of good over evil", refers to the light of higher knowledge dispelling all ignorance, the ignorance that masks one's true nature, not as the body, but as the unchanging, infinite, immanent and transcendent reality. With this awakening comes compassion and the awareness of the oneness of all things (higher knowledge). This brings anand (joy or peace). Just as we celebrate the birth of our physical being, Diwali is the celebration of this Inner Light.
While the story behind Diwali and the manner of celebration varies from region to region (festive fireworks, worship, lights, sharing of sweets), the essence is the same – to rejoice in the Inner Light (Atman) or the underlying Reality of all things (Brahman). CÂəƏ

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diwali

dabbawala tujhe salaam.. ghadi slow ho jati hai tu time par karta apna kam

God Found Gambhir Singh And The Manipuris Found Me Coincidentally

posted at FB I have been approached by BBC CNN all Indian media friends well-wishers from all over the world but not a single med...