Thursday, October 20, 2011

Oops !Yes We do Curse Yazid

if you want too see my picture
and if you are blind
than see it with
you inner eyes
as man to man
I do plead
yes as shias
we do bleed
our drops
every single one
cursing lanatullah yazid
accursed despot
no caste color but hate as creed
No not a Muslim
simple greed
hIs war of vengeance
against Hussain
there was no need
a monster of a man
product of a poison
of a serpent seed

About Yazid from Wikipedia

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yazid_I

Yazid Ibn Muawiyah Ibn Abu Sufyan (July 23, 645 - 683) (Arabic: يزيد بن معاوية بن أبي سفيان) was the second Caliph of the Umayyad dynasty. His mother Maysun, was Christian. He ruled from CE 680 to 683. He is also notable as an object of Shi'a Muslim animosity; they reject his legitimacy and condemn his role in the Battle of Karbala which resulted in the death of Husayn ibn Ali.
Accession to the caliphate
The issue of succession to the caliphate had proved divisive in the past (see Succession to Muhammad). The caliph Muawiyah I took the controversial step of breaking with the Arabian and Islamic tradition of shura, consultation by the leading men of the community to choose the new leader. He founded the first Islamic dynasty by directly designating his son Yazid to succeed him. Muawiyah did attempt to observe the outward forms of shura by requiring his subjects to "choose" his son and swear allegiance to him in his own lifetime. Yazid was duly proclaimed caliph upon his father's death. However, he faced immediate opposition from other Muslims who rejected the dynastic principle and those who supported the claims of different lineages

Battle of Karbala
Main article: Battle of Karbala
Yazid was first opposed by the grandson of Muhammad, Husayn bin Ali. Husayn was the son of the assassinated former caliph Ali ibn Abi Talib. His older brother, Hasan ibn Ali, had briefly claimed the caliphate as well. Husayn, as a descendant of Muhammad, had a claim to the caliphate in the eyes of many Muslims. The Muslims of Kufa in Iraq, which had been the stronghold of Ali, assured Husayn that they would support him if he bid for the caliphate. Based on this support, Husayn decided to march. He started from Mecca and headed towards Kufa.

Husayn headed towards Karbala, from Mecca. While passing through the cities he asked one of his close companions, Zuhayr ibn Qayn, the name of each city he passed by hoping not to miss Karbala. There was a good reason for his questioning to Zuhayr. The reason was that, his maternal grandfather, the prophet Muhammad told him that the city of Karbala would be the place where him and his companions would be martyred. When arriving in Karbala Husayn asked Zuhayr, the name of the city. Zuhayr replied that the name of the city was Taf. Husayn asked Zuhayr if the city had another name. Zuhayr said that the other name of the city was Karbala. According to the book Karbala and Ahusra, by Ali Husayn Jalali, tears appeared on Husayn's face when Zuhayr informed him that the other name of Taf was Karbala. Husayn said: "I seek refuge for Allah in Karb and Bala. This is where we will be unjustly martyred. This is where the woman will be taken captive and will be transported to Kufa and later on to Damascus. This is what my grandfather, the messenger of Allah has told me". Karb means grief and Bala means tribulation, in Arabic. So Husayn was basically saying "I seek refuge for God in grief and tribulation". A detachment from Yazid's army, approximately 40 000 men led by ‘Umar ibn Sa’d, barred his way to the city and then pursued him when he veered away. Husayn's small group was surrounded, cut off from its water supplies, and then, on October 10, 680, all men were killed by the enemy forces, except Ali ibn Husayn. Despite the fact that Husayn's army were outnumbered, each man showed bravery and killed many enemies individually. Husayn split his army of 72 men into 3 sections. The left flank, the right flank and the Ahlul bayt, who were the family of the Prophet. Husayn put Habib ibn Muzahir in charge of the left flank and Zuhayr ibn Qayn in charge of the right flank. According to many shia, and a few sunni books Husayn's army, after starvation and thirst for 3 days, killed approximately 5000 men of the enemy forces. Outside his 72 men, a few people from the enemy forces were influenced by him and joined his side. Among these converts included a man called Hurr al Riyahi. According to the book Karbala and Ashura, by Ali Husayn Jalali, Hurr killed 41 men of the enemy forces before being martyred. When Hurr was martyred, Husayn wiped the blood off Hurr's face with his hand, and said to him, "You are Hurr, as your mother has named you". Hurr, in Arabic means free, so Husayn was saying that Hurr is free. Saying this statement, Husayn meant that Hurr was free from the chains of the devil, because he joined Husayn's forces. Husayn and his men performed miracles of bravery and defiance during this battle. However, Husayn and his men were all killed, except for Ali ibn Husayn, who was taken captive by Yazid's forces


Revolt in Arabia and death of Yazid
Main article: Ibn al-Zubair's revolt
Other Arabs, who were used to choosing leaders by consultation rather than heredity, refused to pledge allegiance to Yazid. A group of companions of Muhammed (Sahaba), including Abdullah ibn Zubayr and Abdullah ibn Umar, opposed Yazid's position as Caliph. Abdullah bin Zubayr launched an insurgency in the Hejaz, the heartland of the Islam, where Mecca and Medinah are. Yazid sent armies against him in 683. After the Battle of al-Harra, Medina was captured and Mecca was also besieged. During the siege, the Kaaba was damaged, reportedly causing significant resentment, even hatred, among the inhabitants of Mecca as well as many Muslims throughout the Islamic empire. The siege ended when Yazid died suddenly in 683 CE. The exact place of Yazid's burial is believed to be at a place in Damascus which is now a steel factory. He was briefly succeeded by his son, Muawiya II.


[edit] Assessments of Yazid

[edit] Non-religious view of Yazid
Although presented in many sources as a dissolute ruler, Yazid energetically tried to continue his father's policies and retained many of the men who served him. He strengthened the administrative structure of the empire and improved the military defenses of Syria, the Umayyad power base. The financial system was reformed. He lightened the taxation of some Christian groups and abolished the tax concessions granted to the Samaritans as a reward for aid they had rendered in the days of the early Arab conquests. He also paid significant attention to agriculture and improved the irrigation system of the Damascus oasis.


[edit] Shi'a view of Yazid
For Shi'a Muslims, Yazid is the consummate villain, who will always be remembered for his murder of Husayn and persecution of his family. He is said to have been fond of wine and the company of courtesans, and completely careless of his religious duties.[citation needed]

The events at Karbala figure as fundamental in Shi'a thought, and many Shi'a Islamist movements liken their causes to Husayn's struggle against Yazid. Leaders of the 1979 Iranian Revolution that overthrew the Pahlavi government frequently drew such comparisons. The 10th of Muharram (also known as Ashura), the Islamic calendar date on which the Battle of Karbala occurred, is commemorated as a day of mourning by Shi'a Muslims around the world. Shi'a rituals on Ashura' usually involve public processions during which Shi'a Muslims curse Yazid and recite poems commemorating Husayn and his death. Shi'as around the world refer to Yazid as "the tyrant" and often add the word Lanatullah (which means May Allah's blessings be removed from him) after his name.


[edit] Sunni view of Yazid
Main article: Sunni view of Yazid I
There is great difference between the majority of Sunni opinion and the Shia opinion. Most Sunnis disagree on the nature of Husayn's opposition[citation needed] to Yazid's rule and Yazid's culpability in Husayn's death. Some scholars (such as Ibn Kathir and Ibn Timiya) have claimed that Husayn opposed Yazid's ascension to the Caliphate but did not actively revolt against him, and that Husayn's killing was ordered not by Yazid but resulted from the aberrant actions of the commander at Kerbala, Shamir ibn Dhi'l-Jaushan who was employed by the Umayyad governor of Iraq, Ubaidallah ibn Ziyad. This view is often supported by the fact that Ubaidallah's methods in suppressing Husayn's alleged insurgence "overshot the mark" and went beyond the extent of violence envisaged by Yezid. Muslim ibn Aqeel a cousin of Husayn was also killed by Ziyad's henchmen. Sir William Muir, in his book 'The Caliphate - Its rise, decline and fall' supports this view.

Others[attribution needed] have refrained from taking a position on the matter, claiming that although Husayn's death was a tragic and unfortunate event, the evidence on exactly how it occurred and who bears responsibility is too inconclusive to merit judgment. This majority Sunni view is mainly taken by those who are concerned to maintain the reputation of Muawiyah as a wise and legitimate caliph. They do not wish to question Muawiyah's choice of his son as his successor, although they do not legitimize Yazid himself. However, some others have joined the Shi'a position, cursing Yazid and denouncing him as an illegitimate ruler. The minority view thus considers Yazid as illegitimate, indulgent, and criminal ruler, who was not only the first dynastic ruler, but directly or indirectly responsible for the killing of the descendants of Muhammad. In any event, Sunnis generally avoid ascribing religious significance to the events at Karbala.


[edit] Was Yazid the sixth or seventh caliph?
A handful of Sunni scholars such as Ibn al-'Arabi[1] and Al-Bayhaqi[2] consider Hasan ibn Ali to be a legitimate caliph occupying the fifth title designation, after his father Ali bin Abu Talib and before Muawiyah I. Under this scenario, Yazid I would be the seventh rather than sixth caliph. However, this is a minority opinion, and most chronologies, both Sunni and among Western academia, do not count Hasan, and number Yazid as the sixth. All Shia scholars and followers know Hussain to be the rightful caliph, and his father, Ali Bin Abu Talib, to be the rightful caliph before him.

Humility Lies at the Feet of Man

180,594 items / 1,421,882 views

Most of my pictures on the streets that show me in the frame are shot by bystanders guys who have never ever used a SLR digital camera.

And I am updating this set Appu My Friend at Flickr... as I am posting some of these images to Facebook for my friends.

most of the time
we complain
our short height
our club feet
cause us pain
our long hands
our bow legged legs
a big protruding belly
makes us look insane
the women complain
more than us because
they have beauty
but lack a brain
a flat chest
a flat ass
varicose veins
cause them
much
greater pain
so obviously
when i shoot
appu my best friend
i thank god
i thank hussain
for making me
what i am
with all my flaws
more sensitive
more humane

I always gagged on the silver spoon.
says citizen kane


dedicated freshly to

SAKO

Hijras Are Human..

a thought no one believes the flesh was willing her androgynous soul grieves standing erect in her grave a sad memory of pain endured she will leave a tale of sorrow that time weaved

Had God Not Rested On the Seventh Day He Would Have Created Hijras

We Miss Jeff Lamb .. Marziya And Firoze Shakir

182,746 items / 1,442,166 views

you came into our lives
like a breath of fresh air
your world with us
you shared ann arbor
as though we had
already been there
you were honest sincere
peace loving and fair
we miss you jeff lamb
but we remember you
each morning
in our prayers


Hi Firoze,
Leyla Lau-Lamb commented on your link.
Leyla wrote: "Thank you Firoze! I love the poem! I am looking at Jeff's prints and I got hundreds and hundreds of them I am very touched and this is a good time to spent and remember and enjoy the images at the same time. love and peace, Leyla"

Ashiq Ka Janaza Hai Unki Galiyon Se Badi Dhoom Se Nikle

182,749 items / 1,441,480 views


unke pathar dil par
akhri paigham
phir ek bar likhle
dulha to ban na sake
phir bhi sera pehan kar
ham ap ki galiyon
se akhri bar nikle

A Turn and a Twist to a Begggars Tail


his fate
he wont
bewail
walls he will
never scale
his flesh
was willing
his spirit frail
there are
those who pray to god
to give them a male
curse god when he
gives them a female
parenthood has now
gone pail the unborn
child in his
mothers womb wails
as god and his
system fails

I Spam The Soul of Fucked Humanity..

Wild Orchids in Bloom

on the road
a path
leading
to their doom
they watch
you
in your car
as you zoom
weft and warp
from a broken loom
wild orchids in bloom
my blogs vying
for attention
despair and gloom
a cosmic poet
in a strange costume
rings on his fingers '
as heirloom
life a fucked showroom
tears of sorrow
manufactured from
a dying womb
a child buried
on a mound
of a tomb

We Beg So We Live

the man
dead drunk
who fucked
our mother
we forgive
we beg so
we live
if we die
our mothers
whorish
wanton
womb
another
child
will outlive

Jesus and his Pet Dog

“Naked a man comes from his mother’s womb,
and as he comes, so he departs.
He takes nothing from his labor
that he can carry in his hand.”

“Let him who is without sin cast the first stone.

The Common Man Caught Between Two Devils Cabs and Rickshas

Oops !Yes We do Curse Yazid

if you want too see my picture
and if you are blind
than see it with
you inner eyes
as man to man
I do plead
yes as shias
we do bleed
our drops
every single one
cursing lanatullah yazid
accursed despot
no caste color but hate as creed
No not a Muslim
simple greed
hIs war of vengeance
against Hussain
there was no need
a monster of a man
product of a poison
of a serpent seed

About Yazid from Wikipedia

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yazid_I

Yazid Ibn Muawiyah Ibn Abu Sufyan (July 23, 645 - 683) (Arabic: يزيد بن معاوية بن أبي سفيان) was the second Caliph of the Umayyad dynasty. His mother Maysun, was Christian. He ruled from CE 680 to 683. He is also notable as an object of Shi'a Muslim animosity; they reject his legitimacy and condemn his role in the Battle of Karbala which resulted in the death of Husayn ibn Ali.
Accession to the caliphate
The issue of succession to the caliphate had proved divisive in the past (see Succession to Muhammad). The caliph Muawiyah I took the controversial step of breaking with the Arabian and Islamic tradition of shura, consultation by the leading men of the community to choose the new leader. He founded the first Islamic dynasty by directly designating his son Yazid to succeed him. Muawiyah did attempt to observe the outward forms of shura by requiring his subjects to "choose" his son and swear allegiance to him in his own lifetime. Yazid was duly proclaimed caliph upon his father's death. However, he faced immediate opposition from other Muslims who rejected the dynastic principle and those who supported the claims of different lineages

Battle of Karbala
Main article: Battle of Karbala
Yazid was first opposed by the grandson of Muhammad, Husayn bin Ali. Husayn was the son of the assassinated former caliph Ali ibn Abi Talib. His older brother, Hasan ibn Ali, had briefly claimed the caliphate as well. Husayn, as a descendant of Muhammad, had a claim to the caliphate in the eyes of many Muslims. The Muslims of Kufa in Iraq, which had been the stronghold of Ali, assured Husayn that they would support him if he bid for the caliphate. Based on this support, Husayn decided to march. He started from Mecca and headed towards Kufa.

Husayn headed towards Karbala, from Mecca. While passing through the cities he asked one of his close companions, Zuhayr ibn Qayn, the name of each city he passed by hoping not to miss Karbala. There was a good reason for his questioning to Zuhayr. The reason was that, his maternal grandfather, the prophet Muhammad told him that the city of Karbala would be the place where him and his companions would be martyred. When arriving in Karbala Husayn asked Zuhayr, the name of the city. Zuhayr replied that the name of the city was Taf. Husayn asked Zuhayr if the city had another name. Zuhayr said that the other name of the city was Karbala. According to the book Karbala and Ahusra, by Ali Husayn Jalali, tears appeared on Husayn's face when Zuhayr informed him that the other name of Taf was Karbala. Husayn said: "I seek refuge for Allah in Karb and Bala. This is where we will be unjustly martyred. This is where the woman will be taken captive and will be transported to Kufa and later on to Damascus. This is what my grandfather, the messenger of Allah has told me". Karb means grief and Bala means tribulation, in Arabic. So Husayn was basically saying "I seek refuge for God in grief and tribulation". A detachment from Yazid's army, approximately 40 000 men led by ‘Umar ibn Sa’d, barred his way to the city and then pursued him when he veered away. Husayn's small group was surrounded, cut off from its water supplies, and then, on October 10, 680, all men were killed by the enemy forces, except Ali ibn Husayn. Despite the fact that Husayn's army were outnumbered, each man showed bravery and killed many enemies individually. Husayn split his army of 72 men into 3 sections. The left flank, the right flank and the Ahlul bayt, who were the family of the Prophet. Husayn put Habib ibn Muzahir in charge of the left flank and Zuhayr ibn Qayn in charge of the right flank. According to many shia, and a few sunni books Husayn's army, after starvation and thirst for 3 days, killed approximately 5000 men of the enemy forces. Outside his 72 men, a few people from the enemy forces were influenced by him and joined his side. Among these converts included a man called Hurr al Riyahi. According to the book Karbala and Ashura, by Ali Husayn Jalali, Hurr killed 41 men of the enemy forces before being martyred. When Hurr was martyred, Husayn wiped the blood off Hurr's face with his hand, and said to him, "You are Hurr, as your mother has named you". Hurr, in Arabic means free, so Husayn was saying that Hurr is free. Saying this statement, Husayn meant that Hurr was free from the chains of the devil, because he joined Husayn's forces. Husayn and his men performed miracles of bravery and defiance during this battle. However, Husayn and his men were all killed, except for Ali ibn Husayn, who was taken captive by Yazid's forces


Revolt in Arabia and death of Yazid
Main article: Ibn al-Zubair's revolt
Other Arabs, who were used to choosing leaders by consultation rather than heredity, refused to pledge allegiance to Yazid. A group of companions of Muhammed (Sahaba), including Abdullah ibn Zubayr and Abdullah ibn Umar, opposed Yazid's position as Caliph. Abdullah bin Zubayr launched an insurgency in the Hejaz, the heartland of the Islam, where Mecca and Medinah are. Yazid sent armies against him in 683. After the Battle of al-Harra, Medina was captured and Mecca was also besieged. During the siege, the Kaaba was damaged, reportedly causing significant resentment, even hatred, among the inhabitants of Mecca as well as many Muslims throughout the Islamic empire. The siege ended when Yazid died suddenly in 683 CE. The exact place of Yazid's burial is believed to be at a place in Damascus which is now a steel factory. He was briefly succeeded by his son, Muawiya II.


[edit] Assessments of Yazid

[edit] Non-religious view of Yazid
Although presented in many sources as a dissolute ruler, Yazid energetically tried to continue his father's policies and retained many of the men who served him. He strengthened the administrative structure of the empire and improved the military defenses of Syria, the Umayyad power base. The financial system was reformed. He lightened the taxation of some Christian groups and abolished the tax concessions granted to the Samaritans as a reward for aid they had rendered in the days of the early Arab conquests. He also paid significant attention to agriculture and improved the irrigation system of the Damascus oasis.


[edit] Shi'a view of Yazid
For Shi'a Muslims, Yazid is the consummate villain, who will always be remembered for his murder of Husayn and persecution of his family. He is said to have been fond of wine and the company of courtesans, and completely careless of his religious duties.[citation needed]

The events at Karbala figure as fundamental in Shi'a thought, and many Shi'a Islamist movements liken their causes to Husayn's struggle against Yazid. Leaders of the 1979 Iranian Revolution that overthrew the Pahlavi government frequently drew such comparisons. The 10th of Muharram (also known as Ashura), the Islamic calendar date on which the Battle of Karbala occurred, is commemorated as a day of mourning by Shi'a Muslims around the world. Shi'a rituals on Ashura' usually involve public processions during which Shi'a Muslims curse Yazid and recite poems commemorating Husayn and his death. Shi'as around the world refer to Yazid as "the tyrant" and often add the word Lanatullah (which means May Allah's blessings be removed from him) after his name.


[edit] Sunni view of Yazid
Main article: Sunni view of Yazid I
There is great difference between the majority of Sunni opinion and the Shia opinion. Most Sunnis disagree on the nature of Husayn's opposition[citation needed] to Yazid's rule and Yazid's culpability in Husayn's death. Some scholars (such as Ibn Kathir and Ibn Timiya) have claimed that Husayn opposed Yazid's ascension to the Caliphate but did not actively revolt against him, and that Husayn's killing was ordered not by Yazid but resulted from the aberrant actions of the commander at Kerbala, Shamir ibn Dhi'l-Jaushan who was employed by the Umayyad governor of Iraq, Ubaidallah ibn Ziyad. This view is often supported by the fact that Ubaidallah's methods in suppressing Husayn's alleged insurgence "overshot the mark" and went beyond the extent of violence envisaged by Yezid. Muslim ibn Aqeel a cousin of Husayn was also killed by Ziyad's henchmen. Sir William Muir, in his book 'The Caliphate - Its rise, decline and fall' supports this view.

Others[attribution needed] have refrained from taking a position on the matter, claiming that although Husayn's death was a tragic and unfortunate event, the evidence on exactly how it occurred and who bears responsibility is too inconclusive to merit judgment. This majority Sunni view is mainly taken by those who are concerned to maintain the reputation of Muawiyah as a wise and legitimate caliph. They do not wish to question Muawiyah's choice of his son as his successor, although they do not legitimize Yazid himself. However, some others have joined the Shi'a position, cursing Yazid and denouncing him as an illegitimate ruler. The minority view thus considers Yazid as illegitimate, indulgent, and criminal ruler, who was not only the first dynastic ruler, but directly or indirectly responsible for the killing of the descendants of Muhammad. In any event, Sunnis generally avoid ascribing religious significance to the events at Karbala.


[edit] Was Yazid the sixth or seventh caliph?
A handful of Sunni scholars such as Ibn al-'Arabi[1] and Al-Bayhaqi[2] consider Hasan ibn Ali to be a legitimate caliph occupying the fifth title designation, after his father Ali bin Abu Talib and before Muawiyah I. Under this scenario, Yazid I would be the seventh rather than sixth caliph. However, this is a minority opinion, and most chronologies, both Sunni and among Western academia, do not count Hasan, and number Yazid as the sixth. All Shia scholars and followers know Hussain to be the rightful caliph, and his father, Ali Bin Abu Talib, to be the rightful caliph before him.

Adil And Alexandra

Adil And Alexandra

Adil and Alexandra

Adil Alexandra and Me..

I Shut my Facebook Account ,, Targeted Shia Harassment

27 May 2018 As a Shia I am targeted even  by  Sufis Sufism that  I promoted vigorously as a Malang .. I have renounced my Malang...