Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Janeu The Holy Brahmin Thread

Janeu is a consecrated thread that is worn by each and every Hindu Brahmin of India. This holy thread of 'Janeo' suggests the development of a male, from a young boy to a man. It is believed that a boy cannot be surmised as "Dvija" (twice born) until he wears the janeu. Besides the Brahmins, Janeo thread is also worn by the Kshatriyas and Vaishyas. The type of Janeu is different for different caste groups or sects of people of the Indian subcontinent.

One is Brahmgandh Janeu (with 5 knots or 3 knots), which is meant for Brahmins and the other is Vishnugandh Janeu (with one knot), meant for other classes. In case a Brahmin desires to become scholarly in the Vedas, he must wear janeu at 5 years of age. If a Kshatriya desires to gain strength, he should wear janeo at 6 and if a Vaishya desires for success, he must wear the Janeu at 8 years of age. Janeu is generally made of cotton thread; however Kshatriya and Vaishya wear threads made out of hempen and wool respectively.

Janeu (Thread) Ceremony
Brahmins celebrate the development of a boy through "Upanayanam Samskara" (sacred thread ceremony). The ceremony is generally observed between the ages of seven and fourteen. In case the ceremony could not take place due to any reason all through this age period, then it is required to be done before the marriage. The purpose of thread ceremony is to prepare a young man to share the responsibilities of elders. The thread is worn by the man in the company of a group chant of 'Gayatri' mantra. The thread is twisted in upward direction to make certain that 'Sattwaguna' (good quality of truth) prevails. The ceremony also suggests that the wearer of 'Janeu' can participate in the family rituals, from now onwards.

Significance of three strands in Janeu
Brahmins use 'Janeu' thread with three strands. These three strands of 'Janeo' have been studied many a times and different personalities gave several opinions regarding this tradition. To some people, the three strands stand for the Hindu Trinity of Brahma, Vishnu and Mahesh. Others interpreted it as symbolical of Mahasarasvati, Mahalakshmi and Mahakali. Many people believed it to be related with past, present and future.

A number of persons stated it to be representative of three qualities - sattva, rajas and tamas. A few considered the three strands as sign of three states-wakefulness, dream and deep sleep. Some of them mentioned it to signify three dimensions of Heaven (swarga), Earth (mrityuloka) and Nether Regions (pataloka). Out of all opinions, the most logical is janeu's account with Ida, pingala and susumna nadi, through which the 'kundalini' (hidden) energy reveals in 'prana' and realization.

How to wear Janeu at different occasions
Janeu is a not an ordinary thread, its sanctity is regarded to get disturbed if it is not worn properly. Here are given different methods to wear Janeu at different occasions.
To attend or perform any auspicious ceremony, one should wear 'janeu' hanging from the left shoulder (Upaviti).
For attending or performing inauspicious event, one should wear 'janeu' hanging from the right shoulder (Prachnaviti).
In case the person wears 'janeu' round the neck like a garland, then, he is called as 'Niviti'.
While going for daily ablutions or doing impure tasks, the holy thread must be raised and its upper part ought to be put behind ear.
Males and females both can wear 'janeu', yet females should wear it around the neck.
Following a birth or death in the family, 'janeu' should be removed and again a new thread ought to be worn after 15 days of event.
One must replace the old or broken thread with a new thread.


www.iloveindia.com/indian-traditions/janeu-ceremeony.html

Banganga

Documenting Pitru Paksh At Banganga Walkeshwar

Swami Smarth Puja At Banganga Walkeshwar

Pitru Paksh Keeping The Banganga Clean Of Puja Leaves

Pitru Paksh Banganga Walkeshwar

Pitru Paksh Banganga Walkeshwar

Pitru Paksh Banganga Walkeshwar

Pitru Paksh Banganga Walkeshwar

The dark half of the Ashwin (September-October) is observe as Pitra Paksha throughout the Hindu world.In Hinduism, Pitru Paksha is the rituals performed by relatives for the departed souls of dead ancestors, parents and relatives.
Shradha is offered to the dead and departed ancestors of the family. On each day of the fortnight, oblations of water and pindas or balls of rice and meal are offered to the dead relatives by the surviving relatives.
A Shraddha is not a funeral ceremony but a supplement to such a ceremony. It is an act of reverential homage to a dead person performed by relatives, and is supposed to supply the dead with strengthening nutriment after the performance of the previous funeral ceremonies has endowed the ethered bodies. It is believed that until Shraddha has been performed the deceased relative is a preta or a restless, wandering ghost and has no real body. Only after the Shraddha, he attains a position among the Petris or Divine Father in their blissful abode called pitri-loka. It is trditionally believed that a Shraddha is most desirable and efficacious when done by a son.
The eldest son or some other elder male member of the family performs Shraddha in honour of the dead and offers oblations. Part of the food-offering is also given to the cows and the crows. Brahmins are fed and given dakshina, for it is believed that whatever is given to the Brahmins also reaches the departed souls. Khir, a sweet milk and rice preparation, is especially prepared and offered to the pitris on this occasion. On the last day of the fortnight,i.e. on the Amavasya oblations are offered to all those those dead ancestors whose tithi of death is not known. In Brahma Purana the significance of this ceremony is described. During Pitra Paksha shaving of the beard, cutting of the hair, wearing of new clothes, paring of the nails are not allowed.

blessingsonthenet.com/indian-festival/festival/id/117/pit...

Pitru Paksh Banganga Walkeshwar

Pitru Paksh Banganga Walkeshwar

Pitru Paksh

Pitru Paksh Banganga Walkeshwar

The Hindu Monk

Pitru Paksh Banganga Walkeshwar

Pitru Paksh

Pitru Paksh.. Prayers For The Dead

Pitru Paksh Banganga Walkeshwar

Pitru Paksh Banganga Walkeshwar

Pitru Paksh Banganga Walkeshwar




From Wikipedia

Pitru Paksha (Sanskrit: पितृ पक्ष), also spelt as Pitr paksha or Pitri paksha, (literally "fortnight of the ancestors") is a 16–lunar day period when Hindus pay homage to their ancestors (Pitrs), especially through food offerings. The period is also known as Pitru Pakshya, Pitri Pokkho, Sola Shraddha ("sixteen shraddhas"), Kanagat, Jitiya, Mahalaya Paksha and Apara paksha.[1][2][3]
Pitru Paksha is considered by Hindus to be inauspicious, given the death rite performed during the ceremony, known as Shraddha or tarpan. In southern and western India, it falls in the Hindu lunar month of Bhadrapada (September–October), beginning with the full moon day (Purnima) that occurs immediately after the Ganesh festival and ending with the new moon day known as Sarvapitri amavasya, Mahalaya amavasya or simply Mahalaya. In North India and Nepal, this period corresponds to the dark fortnight of the month Ashvin, instead of Bhadrapada.

Legend

According to Hindu mythology, the souls of three preceding generations of one's ancestor reside in Pitru–loka, a realm between heaven and earth. This realm is governed by Yama, the god of death, who takes the soul of a dying man from earth to Pitru–loka. When a person of the next generation dies, the first generation shifts to heaven and unites with God, so Shraddha offerings are not given. Thus, only the three generations in Pitru–loka are given Shraddha rites, in which Yama plays a significant role.[4] According to the sacred Hindu epics (Itihasa), at the beginning of Pitru Paksha, the sun enters the zodiac sign of Virgo (Kanya). Coinciding with this moment, it is believed that the spirits leave Pitru–loka and reside in their descendants' homes for a month until the sun enters the next zodiac—Scorpio (Vrichchhika)—and there is a full moon. Hindus are expected to propitiate the ancestors in the first half, during the dark fortnight.[2][5]
When the legendary donor Karna died in the epic Mahabharata war, his soul transcended to heaven, where he was offered gold and jewels as food. However, Karna needed real food to eat and asked Indra, the lord of heaven, the reason for serving gold as food. Indra told Karna that he had donated gold all his life, but had never donated food to his ancestors in Shraddha. Karna said that since he was unaware of his ancestors, he never donated anything in their memory. To make amends, Karna was permitted to return to earth for a 15–day period, so that he could perform Shraddha and donate food and water in their memory. This period is now known as Pitru Paksha.[6] In some legends, Yama replaces Indra.[7]
[edit]Importance

Annadaana or giving food to the hungry is a central part of the rituals during these 16 days. On all these days, offerings are made to the departed, including those whose names or manner of death are not known. On these days tarpan, shraaddha and pinda daan are performed daily according to the procedures under the guidance of a priest. Although these rites are to be carried out daily in this fortnight, it is considered that to perform them on the last day i.e. on Mahalaya Amavasya or Sarva Pitru Amavasya is extremely important and sacred. The performance of Shraddha by a son during Pitru Paksha is regarded as a compulsory by Hindus, to ensure that the soul of the ancestor goes to heaven. In this context, the scripture Garuda Purana says, "there is no salvation for a man without a son".[4] The scriptures preach that a householder should propitiate ancestors (Pitris), along with the gods (devas), ghosts (bhutas) and guests.[1] The scripture Markandeya Purana says that if the ancestors are content with the shraddhas, they will bestow health, wealth, knowledge and longevity, and ultimately heaven and salvation (moksha) upon the performer.[2]
The performance of Sarvapitri amavasya rites can also compensate a forgotten or neglected annual shraddha ceremony, which should ideally coincide with the death anniversary of the deceased. According to Sharma, the ceremony is central to the concept of lineages. Shraddha involves oblations to three preceding generations—by reciting their names—as well as to the mythical lineage ancestor (gotra). A person thus gets to know the names of six generations (three preceding generation, his own and two succeeding generations—his sons and grandsons) in his life, reaffirming lineage ties.[1] Anthropologist Usha Menon of Drexel University presents a similar idea—that Pitru Paksha emphasises the fact that the ancestors and the current generation and their next unborn generation are connected by blood ties. The current generation repays their debt to the ancestors in the Pitru Paksha. This debt is considered of utmost importance along with a person's debt to his gurus and his parents.[8]
[edit]Rules of Shradh

[edit]When and where
The shraddha is performed on the specific lunar day during the Pitru Paksha, when the ancestor—usually a parent or paternal grandparent—died. There are exceptions to the lunar day rule; special days are allotted for people who died in a particular manner or had a certain status in life. Chautha Bharani and Bharani Panchami, the fourth and fifth lunar day respectively, are allocated for people deceased in the past year. Avidhava navami ("Unwidowed ninth"), the ninth lunar day, is for married women who died before their husband. Widowers invite Brahmin women as guests for their wife's shraddha. The twelfth lunar day is for children and ascetics who had renounced the worldly pleasures. The fourteenth day is known as Ghata chaturdashi or Ghayala chaturdashi, and is reserved for those people killed by arms, in war or suffered a violent death.[2][4]


Mahalaya marks the formal beginning of the Durga Puja festival
Sarvapitri amavasya ("all fathers' new moon day") is intended for all ancestors, irrespective of the lunar day they died. It is the most important day of the Pitru Paksha.[2][4] Those who have forgotten to perform shraddha can do so on this day. A shraddha ritual performed on this day is considered as fruitful as one conducted in the holy city of Gaya, which is seen as a special place to perform the rite, and hosts a fair during the Pitru Paksha period.[3] In Bengal, Mahalaya (Bengali: মহালয়া) marks the beginning of Durga Puja festivities. Mahalaya is the day when the goddess Durga is believed to have descended to Earth. Bengali people traditionally wake up early in the morning on Mahalaya to recite hymns from the Devi Mahatmyam (Chandi) scripture. Offerings to the ancestors are made in homes and at puja mandaps (temporary shrines).[9][10] Matamaha ("Mother's father") or Dauhitra ("Daughter's son") also marks the first day of the month of Ashvin and beginning of the bright fortnight. It is assigned for the grandson of the deceased maternal grandfather.[2][4]
The ritual is also held on the death anniversary of the ancestor. The shraddha is performed only at noon, usually on the bank of a river or lake or at one's own house.[4] Families may also make a pilgrimage to places like Varanasi and Gaya to perform Shraddha.[2][3][11]
[edit]Who and for whom
It is essential that Shraddha is performed by the son—usually the eldest—or male relative of the paternal branch of the family, limited to the preceding three generations. However, on Sarvapitri amavasya or matamaha, the daughter's son can offer Shraddha for the maternal side of his family if a male heir is absent in his mother's family.[2][4] Some castes only perform the shraddha for one generation.[2] Prior to performing the rite, the male should have experienced a sacred thread ceremony. Since the ceremony is considered inauspicious due to its association with death, the royal family of Kutch, the king or heirs of the throne are prohibited from conducting Shraddha.[4]
[edit]Food
The food offerings made to the ancestors are usually cooked in silver or copper vessels and typically placed on a banana leaf or cups made of dried leaves. The food must include Kheer (a type of sweet rice and milk), lapsi (a sweet porridge made of wheat grains), rice, dal (lentils), the vegetable of spring bean (guar) and a yellow gourd (pumpkin).[4]
[edit]Rites of shraddha
The male who performs the shraddha should take a purifying bath beforehand and is expected to wear a dhoti. He wears a ring of kush grass. Then the ancestors are invoked to reside in the ring. The shraddha is usually performed bare-chested, as the position of the sacred thread worn by him needs to be changed multiple times during the ceremony. The shraddha involves pinda-daan, which is an offering to the ancestors of pindas (cooked rice and barley flour balls mixed with ghee and black sesame seeds), accompanying the release of water from the hand. It is followed by the worship of Vishnu in form of the darbha grass, a gold image or Shaligram stone and Yama. The food offering is then made, cooked especially for the ceremony on the roof. The offering is considered to be accepted if a crow arrives and devours the food; the bird is believed to be a messenger from Yama or the spirit of the ancestors.[2] A cow and a dog are also fed, and Brahmin priests are also offered food. Once the ancestors (crow) and Brahmins have eaten, the family members can begin lunch.[4]
[edit]Other practices

Some families also conduct ritual recitals of scriptures such the Bhagavata Purana and the Bhagavad Gita.[4][12] Others may be charitable and present gifts to the priests or pay them to recite prayers for the ancestor's well-being.[12]

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pitru_Paksha

The Beggars of Banganga On Pitru Paksh

Pitru Paksh 2012

Pitru Paksh 2012

Pitru Paksh

Pitru Paksh

Pitru Paksh

Pitru Paksh

Pitru Paksh

Pitru Paksh

Pitru Paksh

I Shoot Barbers Like No One Does

Pitru Paksh

Pitru Paksh.. 2012

The Indian Armpit ,,,Is Always A Super Hit ..

Pitru Paksh 2012

The Beggars of Banganga Pitru Paksh

Beggars Of Banganga Pitru Paksh

Armpit Shaving

Pitru Paksh Banganga 2012

Pitru Paksh 2012 Banganga

Pitru Paksh 2012 Banganga

Pitru Paksh 2012 Banganga

Pitru Paksh 2012 Banganga

Pitru Paksh 2012 Banganga

The Pictorially Possessed



cosmically
holistically
karmically
blessed
sartorially
mid eastern
with a turban
as head dress
no forwarding
address
no worldly
success
shooting
the homeless
marginalized
beggars others
humanly
oppressed
lepers with
stumps
oozing pus
blood abscess
pilgrims in
distress
madmen
insane
lunatics
dispossessed

Netaji Salgira Mubarak Ho



lambi umar tak
seat par chitke raho
doodh main naho
pyaz main palo
mummy ne kaha
yeh bar netaji
ko phul ke bajaye
100 rupaye kilo
ki onions do..
toh pure 5 kilo
onions apki birthday
par mubarak ho
apko aur party ki
jai ho..apki zindagi
main ho overflow
dher sari benami
property apki ho
petrol pump
dance bar
school college
hospital newspaper
malls sab kuch
ap par nichawar ho
ap ke shesht hathon
main sada power ho
may you grow
may you grow
apke dushman ki
aiechi go..
hardik subheccha
apko apki birthday
mubarak ho


Alif Zabar Aa Alif Zer Ae Alif Pesh O

Abba Ne Kaha Unse Keh Do 5 Bore Pyaz Ke Jahez Main De



warne apni
beti ki shadi
kahin aur karein
hamara beta
honar uska
intezar bilkul
na karein
hamein nahi
chaihye rupya
motor dukan
bungla yeh
sab hamare
thokar main hai
hame chaiye pyaz
ke bore ,,hame
age bore na karen

Tamatar Aur Pyaz Main Ho Gaya Jhagda



gandu tamatar
jalne laga .
onion ka bhav
sunkar machalne
laga ,..kyon waqt
ne ki ye dagah
upar se neeche
gusse main usne
onion se kaha
dekh ek din teri
bajaunga bahut
chup raha ..netao
se milkar tu
bhav khane laga
sale kale kalute
hamare pao ke
neeche thi teri jagah

We Are Two Branches Of A Peaceful Tree


overladen
with hope
harmony
humanity
humility
hospitality
our religion
diverse
different
but shares
the lyrics
of equality
soundless
soliloquy
of peace
touches
the truth
of our
dichotomy
i am as
much
a hindu
my cultural
inheritance
my indianness
my one and only
true natural identity
cosmic karmic
cause effect
reality ...

Shaving The Indian Armpit ..



where
wisdom
of the
indian man
sits ,,a powerful
force in worse
calamities
a source of
kinetic energy
emits ...dropping
a man dead if
it hits the nostrils
a diabolical blow
transmits.. the
indian armpit
lives in crowded
suburban trains
at kumbh melas
holistic benefit
of the common man
for the common man
by the common man
a democratic ..criteria
with a personality split

Eid Ul Fitr Namaz Bandra Station 2018

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